Darren Rigo’s “The Woods” March 12- April 14, 2015

innermostpart

Rigo’s work focuses on childhood memories from growing up in the countryside. While the work plays with ideas from his childhood imagination, it also considers the relationship between man and nature. The lot in which Rigo grew up was a hundred-acre parcel of land belonging to his grandfather. It was more of a weed lot than a farm, there were no animals and the fields were left untended for years before Rigo was born. As a child Rigo would explore the woods and swamps pretending he was on a quest for a treasure, a lost civilization or on an odyssey home. He would pretended that the trees were a giant to fight, a series of stones became the only way across a raging river. A hunter’s shelter became a hermit’s camp. He always persevered in the end and made it home for dinner.

Darren Rigo’s grandfather, having grown up in the depression, was a bit of a hoarder. The barn on our farm was his cache. It was filled with just about anything he found a good deal on: metres of fire hose, a long wooden ladder, a wine press. But by far what he had the most of was his endless boxes scrap fabric and string. Tucked in the corner of the barn there was a loom and on it he would weave these scraps into colourful rugs. Rigo would visit him while he was working and he would tell Rigo about his plans for what he could do with all this stuff or his own theories about the farm: how something was buried in the hill east of the house by an ancient civilization, or how the skating pond was formed by a huge meteor.

Comments are closed.